Explore the Outdoors!

Category: Microbes

My specialty is microbiology and I share some of my knowledge in these articles!

  • Do Paramecium Have A Cell Wall? (The Pellicle Explained!)

    Do Paramecium Have A Cell Wall? (The Pellicle Explained!)

    Paramecium is a genus of unicellular ciliates, commonly studied as a representative of the ciliate group. Paramecia are widespread in freshwater environments and are often very abundant in stagnant basins and ponds. The body of Paramecia is a single cell that resembles that of animals more than those of plants, but it is neither and…

  • What Do Paramecium Eat? (How Do They Eat?)

    What Do Paramecium Eat? (How Do They Eat?)

    Paramecium are single-celled heterotrophic organisms that live in water. They are very common and can be found in ponds, lakes, and streams. Paramecium are non-photosynthetic and must obtain their nutrition from other sources. Paramecium are opportunistic feeders and will consume a variety of organic matter, including bacteria, algae, yeast, detritus, and even other smaller protozoans.…

  • Are Decomposers Autotrophs or Heterotrophs? (Answered!)

    Are Decomposers Autotrophs or Heterotrophs? (Answered!)

    Decomposers are heterotrophs because they feed on the organic waste from other organisms. Heterotrophs feed on other organisms, while autotrophs produce their own food through photosynthesis or chemosynthesis. While all decomposers are heterotrophs, certain autotrophs play an important role in the decomposition process by converting decomposed nutrients into compounds that can be absorbed by plants.…

  • Are Cyanobacteria Autotrophs or Heterotrophs?

    Are Cyanobacteria Autotrophs or Heterotrophs?

    Cyanobacteria are a large group of differently shaped bacteria that are all able to perform photosynthesis. They are an important part of the global carbon cycle and produce a large amount of the world’s oxygen. Cyanobacteria are also known as blue-green algae, although they are not actually algae but bacteria. Cyanobacteria are autotrophs, meaning they…

  • Do Animal Cells Have A Cell Wall? (Answered And Explained!)

    Do Animal Cells Have A Cell Wall? (Answered And Explained!)

    In my teaching as a molecular biologist, this is a question I get asked surprisingly often! So I decided to write this article as a guide to my students and anyone else interested in the topic of animal cell anatomy and cell walls. Other living organisms like plants and fungi also consist of cells, but…

  • What Do Blepharisma Eat? (Are the Autotrophs?)

    What Do Blepharisma Eat? (Are the Autotrophs?)

    Blepharisma are common ciliates belonging to the kingdom of protists that live in fresh and salt water. They are heterotrophic, which means that they cannot produce their own food and must instead rely on other organisms for sustenance. The primary food source for Blepharisma is bacteria, although they will also consume algae and other microorganisms.…

  • Are Algae Decomposers? (Know The Facts!)

    Are Algae Decomposers? (Know The Facts!)

    Algae are plant-like organisms that grow in water. They are classified as producers since they create their own food using sunlight, sugar, carbon dioxide and minerals. Algae are not decomposers but producers. This is because algae live predominantly off sunlight using photosynthesis to extract energy and they breathe CO2 to obtain carbon atoms to build…

  • Are Cyanobacteria Decomposers?

    Are Cyanobacteria Decomposers?

    Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are a type of bacteria that live in fresh and salt water environments. Cyanobacteria are often mistaken for plants because of this, but they are actually bacteria not plants. They are producers, meaning they produce their own food using photosynthesis. Because cyanobacteria can make their own energy through photosynthesis,…

  • Decomposers In The Ocean? (Top 5 Examples Explained!)

    Decomposers In The Ocean? (Top 5 Examples Explained!)

    Decomposers play an equally important role in marine ecosystems as they do in land ecosystems and they are just as numerous and diverse! In the ocean, the most abundant decomposers are bacteria, marine worms, Echinoderms, Crustaceans and Mollusks. They all get their energy by breaking down dead organic matter that float around or fall to…

  • Do Tadpoles Eat Algae? Do They Eat Seaweed?

    Do Tadpoles Eat Algae? Do They Eat Seaweed?

    Tadpoles are the larvae stage of frogs and they are too small to eat insects like grown up frogs do. Therefore they eat a variety of smaller particles floating around in the water or attached to surfaces that they can lick off! Tadpoles eat mostly microorganisms and they majority of these are algae and bacteria.…